Here is a great new article in which Dr. Tim Jackson and I were interviewed by the awesome people at HoneyColony.com. It is titled, “Black Mold Is A Worldwide Problem, But How Do You Know When You’ve Been Affected, And What Should You Do?”

 

Here is an excerpt: ““The EPA has said that the air in our homes is two to five times more polluted than outside,” explains Moe Bedard, owner of Mold Safe Solutions, a nationwide business offering mold testing, inspections, consultants and education.

If you smell mildew in your home, you are actively breathing in millions of spores in every single breath. Your body is telling you by that smell that there is a problem. Unfortunately, people don’t look into the toxic black mold issue, and within six months to a year, the smell goes away because they become immune to it.

Another way to detect if you have a mold problem is to observe whether  any weird symptoms, such as allergies disappear or ameliorate when you leave the house.

Determining the location and then treating the mold is not always as simple as it seems. If you can visibly see mold or mildew, such as in the shower, on tile or around the toilet, don’t turn to bleach, as “it doesn’t effectively kill the mold.” Bedard recommends a filling a spray bottle ¾ with warm water, adding a small amount of natural dish or laundry soap, a bit of white vinegar, and several drops of tea tree oil – this is a biocide that will kill 99.3 percent of all micro organisms, whether bacteria or mold fungus.

Understanding that your flu-like symptoms are the result of mycotoxins (mold), is not an easy or quick process. According to Bedard, it usually takes patients several months or years to understand that their symptoms are not the result of an infection. He regularly counsels people who have received incorrect information and, once they understand the source of their illness, aren’t sure what to do. If untreated, toxic amounts of mold in the body can cause serious health problems, and can even lead to death.

 
“People are afraid to rely on themselves and information they learn,” Bedard cautions. “It is important to gather all of the information you need, and then rely on that knowledge to get the proper care.”
 
It is always important to be your own advocate. While it may take time to properly research your condition and know when to seek additional help, in the end, it could save your life.”